Password managers are essential tools for navigating the contemporary online world. With the increasing importance of personal information security, integrating such a tool into your online routine is way overdue.

This article will brief you on the importance of password managers in 2019 while giving an overview of 10 of the best free tools available:

  1. Chrome Password Manager
  2. Last Pass
  3. Dashlane
  4. Avast Password Manager
  5. Firefox Password Manager
  6. 1Password
  7. EnPass
  8. Keeper
  9. Keepass
  10. Avira Password Manager

Read on for the detailed analysis of each app.


Why You Should Use One of the Best-advanced Password Managers

Everyone does it even though we all know better. That’s right, I’m talking about reusing weak passwords. With almost every online service from social media to making job applications requiring account setup and password management, the default choice is to reuse a simple password over and over again. But the security implications of such a practice are many, do you know the risks?

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Reusing a password across different platforms makes you more vulnerable to crime such as identity theft, hacking, espionage, and more. With so much of your personal information floating around online, isn’t it about time you started taking security seriously? Fortunately, password managers, secure services for managing your passwords from all in one place, have come a long way in recent years. Even better, some of the best password managers are totally free for personal use.


How do Free Password Managers Work?

With all your vulnerable personal information stored online, from credit card numbers, CVV codes, banking pins, social security numbers, health records, date of birth, and more, its high time you invested in an app. While it can seem daunting at first, password managers are more straightforward to use than you might think.

Instead of having to remember all your different passwords, they simply require you to remember one. This single password is required to unlock your personal vault, where unique passwords for all your online subscriptions and services are stored. Vaults are protected with encryption so tough that even the best hackers in the world are unlikely to waste their time trying to crack it.

Of course, password managers are not a panacea for all your security needs but used properly, they are a powerful tool to augment any users security regime. Beyond enhanced security, password managers also offer everyday convenience. No longer do you need to remember every single unique password for all your accounts, nor do have to rely on reusing the same contrived password over and over again.

Now read on to get an overview of some of the top recommended best free password managers.


1. Chrome Password Manager

Manage your passwords easily with Google Chromes’ Password Manager. The best thing about the Chrome Password Manager is that it supports all devices and operating systems. Any device that supports Chrome will have no trouble with the manager, whether it’s Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, or iOS.

If you’re already using the latest version of Chrome as your default web browser, then chances are you’re already using Chrome’s password manager unless you’ve manually disabled it. In case you have disabled it and would like to use it, click on your profile in the top right-hand corner of the browser and select “Passwords”. Here you can toggle whether or not you would like Chrome to save your passwords. Easy!

From now on, every time to log into a new account, Chrome will ask you whether or not you would like to save the new password. Select yes to save it and forget it. Speaking of security, Chrome receives regular updates every six weeks, ensuring that it is up to date and ready to handle the latest security concerns.

👆 SPECS:

Works on: Chrome OS
Price: Free
Two-factor Authentication: Yes

PROS:

  • Already Integrated into the Chrome Ecosystem
  • Easy to Toggle on and Off
  • Regular Security Updates

⛔️ CONS:

  • Google is a Highly Visible Target for Hackers

2. Last Pass

LastPass is one of the most popular password managers offering a number of its features for free. The best thing is it can be used on all operating systems: iOS, macOS, Windows, Android, Chrome OS, Linux and it has browser extensions as well. It’s available even for Apple Watch and Android Wear smartwatches.

LastPass stores your encrypted information on its cloud servers meaning you can access your data from computers other than yours and share your passwords with others. Free LastPass features include multi-factor authentication, a password generator for creating unique and custom passwords, auto-fill, and free credit monitoring.

Among premium features are the following: one-to-many sharing (sharing an item with multiple people), 1GB encrypted file storage so you can store your critical documents, emergency access, priority tech support and many others.

👆 SPECS:

Works on: Mac, iOS, Windows, Android, Linux, Chrome OS, Windows Phone, watchOS
Price: Free/ $38 per year/1user, $48 per year/6 user
Two-factor Authentication:: Yes

PROS:

  • Generates Strong Passwords
  • Stores Unlimited Logins
  • Automatic Form Completion
  • No Ads
  • Password One-click Change
  • Clean and Intuitive UI

⛔️ CONS:

  • Has Experienced Security Vulnerabilities in the Past

3. Dashlane

Dashlane is a well-designed, easy-to-use password manager app that allows you to manage up to 50 passwords and autofill all your personal information on your favorite device for free. One of the most fascinating features of the app is that if any of the sites you access has had a breach, you will be notified about it.

With a paid Dashlane version you can create, save and manage an unlimited number of passwords on unlimited number of devices, sync passwords across all your devices, back up your account, share passwords; Dashlane Premium also offers security monitoring and breach alerts. Premium Plus includes a VPN, a separate secure browser, credit monitoring, and Identity Theft insurance.

Dashlane provides you with the option not to store your password data on their servers, however, in this case you have to disable sync, so since that moment you're responsible for managing, backing up and moving your password data across devices.

👆 SPECS:

Works on: Mac, iOS, Windows, Android, Linux, Chrome OS, watchOS
Price: Free/ $39.96 per year
Two-factor Authentication: Yes

PROS:

  • Scans Dark Web for Compromised Accounts
  • Stunning Interface
  • Easy Password Changing Option
  • Extensions Available for All Major Browsers
  • Paid Version Includes VPN Protection

⛔️ CONS:

  • No Syncing Across Devices in Free Version
  • Expensive, Especially if You Already Have a VPN
  • Limited Support for Internet Explorer

4. Avast Password Manager

For those already familiar with the contemporary cybersecurity sphere, Avast is synonymous with the free antivirus software that already protects almost half a billion users the world over. In addition to its excellent antivirus software, Avast offers a password manager either as a stand-alone program or as a complementary add-on to its free antivirus software. However, it’s important to note that Avast is only available on Mac and Windows.

All things considered, Avast is a rather minimalist password manager only capable of handling certain data types such as website logins, credit card data, and secure notes. While this should cover most of your bases, it does leave some important data types out, specifically email accounts and wifi networks. That being said, Avast’s simplicity translates to a relatively easy to operate user interface. Finally, its Mac compatible stand-alone version makes it one of the best password managers for Mac.

👆 SPECS:

Works on: Mac, Windows, Android, IPhone
Price: Free
Two-factor Authentication: No

PROS:

  • A Simple and Easy User Interface
  • A Reliable and Trustworthy Provider

⛔️ CONS:

  • Limited to Specific Data Types
  • Manual Login Required

5. Firefox Password Manager

If you care about privacy, Firefox is the best choice for a password manager. Available with the famous Firefox free web browser, the Firefox password manager allows users to manage and safely encrypt their passwords. While reliable, safe, secure, and open source, Firefox’s password manager is relatively minimalist and thus may not satisfy every user's potential needs.

When compared to other web browser based password managers, Firefox is definitely the best, simply due to the fact that as an open-sourced platform, Firefox does not sell user data to third parties unlike most of its competitors. Finally, Firefox’s password manager can easily import your passwords from Chrome and Internet Explorer.

👆 SPECS:

Works on: Firefox
Price: Free
Two-factor Authentication: Yes

PROS:

  • Open-sourced
  • Privacy-focused
  • Does not Sell User Data to Third-party Advertisers

⛔️ CONS:

  • Basic with a Few Customizable Features
  • No Password Generator

6. 1Password

1Password is the best password manager for those who are entirely on the Apple ecosystem and one of the few apps that doesn't support the premium pricing model.
The app offers a strong password generator, as well as username and password storage (including secure sharing), unlimited password syncing across multiple devices, account access both online and offline, a security audit, security alerts and intuitive user interface.

You can easily import your password data, as 1Password supports import from LastPass, Dashlane, SplashID, Roboform and other 1Password accounts; you can also import data from other managers and services via a third party utility or as a CSV file. The mobile app supports biometric unlock on both iOS and Android, so you don't need to type in your master password every time.

1Password supports two-factor authentication, provides a user with a 34-character secret key, which can be used in combination with the master password, the older version of 1Password allows you to sync data locally or on iCloud or Dropbox rather than 1Password servers.

A unique feature of 1Password' is its Travel Vault, a handy feature for frequent travelers. It allows you to remove specific accounts from your on-device storage so they can't be tampered with or copied (they will be restored from the Internet once you switch Travel Mode off).

👆 SPECS:

Works on: Mac, iOS, Windows, Android, Linux, and Chrome OS
Price: $35.88 per year
Two-factor Authentication: Yes

PROS:

  • Offers Trial Version
  • Secure yet Simple Authentication When Adding New Devices
  • Travel Mode to Safely Cross Borders
  • Unlimited Passwords, Items, and 1 GB Document Storage

⛔️ CONS:

  • Limited Import Options
  • Lack of Google Drive Sync
  • Not Compatible with Internet Explorer

7. EnPass

EnPass seems to be one of the few free passwords managers, that works on pretty much everything, including BlackBerry devices, Linux, and Chromebook. It lets you store and fill credit cards, add secure notes or file attachments, but you can't autofill contact info.

Enpass has no associated cloud service and is oriented around local stores of data, what means you can't access to your data in a Web browser or share passwords securely with other users. The advantage of it is that the hacking and breach footprint can be reduced substantially. Anyway, if you want to keep your passwords in sync across multiple devices, the product allows for cloud sync across iCloud, Dropbox, OwnCloud, Google Drive, OneDrive and Box.

The desktop version of EnPass is free, however, you'll have to pay a $9.99 one-time fee for each mobile device.

👆 SPECS:

Works on: Mac, iOS, Android, Windows, Linux, Chromebook
Price: Free/ $11.99 one time per mobile device
Two-factor Authentication: No

PROS:

  • Totally Free Desktop Version for Mac OS, Windows, and Linux
  • Syncs Across Many Platforms
  • Generates Strong Passwords
  • Secure Sharing
  • Automatic Password Capture
  • Can Sub for Google Authenticator
  • All the Premium Features are Free for Linux

⛔️ CONS:

  • Limited Free Version for Mobile Use
  • Syncing Requires Third-party Cloud Storage

8. Keeper

Keeper is a full-featured password manager with a robust web interface, offering a wide range of supported devices and browsers, along with a number of strong authentication methods.

Keeper allows your data to be limited for certain regions (and the data isn't stored in these regions), like many other password managers, it supports biometric login (fingerprint and face recognition) on mobile and allows you to set a legacy or emergency contact who can have access to your data in case of an emergency situation.

Keeper, unfortunately, doesn't have a bulk password changer, and it will not let you create a PIN to access the mobile app quickly. Thus, if your phone doesn't support biometric login, you'll have to enter the full master password every time.

Keeper allows you to import your password data from a wide range of other password manager apps and password stores from Chrome, Firefox, and Opera.

👆 SPECS:

Works on: Mac, iOS, Android, Windows, Linux
Price: start from $29.99 per year
Two-factor Authentication: Yes

PROS:

  • Supports All Popular Platforms and Browsers
  • Supports Biometric Login
  • Retains Full History of Passwords and Files
  • Secure Password Sharing and Inheritance
  • Fills Web Forms and App Passwords
  • Free Trial
  • Optional Secure File Storage

⛔️ CONS:

  • No Fully Automated Password Updates

9. Keepass

Another great free and open-source password manager, Keepass offers users many versatile features and wide customisability. What’s unique about Keepass is that it doesn’t store your passwords in the cloud, instead, Keepass stores passwords and other data locally on your device. The upside of local storage is that it empowers the user to take control of their security needs, but this may also be yet another responsibility most users can do without. Of course, you can also upload your local Keepass storage to the cloud.

Keepass is intended for, and best used by, those with more advanced knowledge of cybersecurity and password managers in general. In this sense, Keepass is both very powerful and full of great features. Another great perk of local device storage is that you can download your entire password library onto a portable storage device like a USB-drive and take it anywhere!

👆 SPECS:

Works on: Windows, Mac, Linux, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Chrome, and Safari.
Price: Free
Two-factor Authentication: Yes

PROS:

  • Local Storage
  • Portable
  • Highly Customizable
  • Open-sourced

⛔️ CONS:

  • Complicated Setup With a Tricky User Interface
  • Requires Manual Syncing

10. Avira Password Manager

The password manager from Avira is one of the latest offerings from the successful German cybersecurity company Avira. The free version of the password manager from Avira is relatively minimalistic in its offerings but gets the job done well. Available for most browsers, Avira’s password manager works for Firefox, Chrome, Android, and iOS.

Avira offers auto-fill for email and passwords, prompts before saving new data items, and the ability to auto-generate new passwords. If you’ve used other password managers before, you can experiment with Avira by easily importing your passwords from other platforms. One of the main drawbacks with Avira is that it does not support two-factor authentification, nor does it offer you the ability to add additional notes or data information to such as security questions to saved passwords.

👆 SPECS:

Works on: Firefox, Chrome, Android, and iOS
Price: Free
Two-factor Authentication: No

PROS:

  • Trusted Provider
  • Auto-fill for Email and Passwords

⛔️ CONS:

  • No Two-factor Authentification
  • Limited Features

Browse Safely with a Password Manager

Hopefully, by now you’ve narrowed your search for a good password manager. We’ve covered some of the best password managers here, but there many more out there as well.